Recent data for Covid-19 cases and tests alongside state population size, along with deaths from 2017-2018 flu, with options for more rates. The Covid-19 data is from Politico via The COVID Tracking Project as of 4-05-20 AM of positive cases per state, and the # of tests done (the more tested, the more cases are found), the increased number of tests done since last week, and the # of deaths, alongside the total population of each state (you must do the math for the percentages left out), plus death rates for the 2017-18 flu.

There are clear contrasts between states as regards the reported data, and what can effect such includes everything from population density, the average age of the population, the number of tests done and the type of tests that are used, to how the cause of death is assigned, to even the climate and more. But I hope some find this data useful which it took me hours to make and to update, by the grace of God. Yet what would also be additionally useful would be the percentages of tests per population, and of positive infections per tests, and per capita and of deaths per infections and per capita of total pop. If someone wants to do the calculations and post them I will add them to an updated chart here. Otherwise this table might not be updated until the rate of cases and deaths decrease.

I use the Politico tracking because while it is not as quickly updates as that of John Hopkins or World o Meter, yet it provides the increased number of tests. The numbers are constantly changing, and the order of the states in the row below was based upon a report by CNN in a 3-13 report which was the basis for my first version of this compilation.

For Covid, the NYT (3-13) sounded this alarm: “Between 160 million and 214 million people in the U.S. could be infected over the course of the epidemic. And that it could last months or even over a year, with infections concentrated in shorter periods, staggered across time in different communities, experts said. As many as 200,000 to 1.7 million people could die.” (https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/13/us/coronavirus-deaths-estimate.html)

Below the table are also some stats on other causes of death. Also, most of the names of the states in the table are listed according to how they were first ordered in a report by CNN in a 3-13 report of cases, which was the basis for my first version of this compilation.

In any case, I pray that this crisis, both real and inflated, works to bring souls to realize the need for help from above, for repentance and mercy from God through faith in the risen Lord Jesus, thanks be to God.

State

Population

COVID-19 cases (positive tests)

Tests

Test increase since last week

Deaths from COVID-19 (4-05-20)

% of total population tested

% of + infections per test

% of infections per capita

% of deaths per infections

% of deaths per capita

Deaths from flu in 2017-2018 (last available data from CDC)

New York

19,453,561

113,704

283,621

+111,261

3,565






4,749

Washington (30+ tied to one nursing home )

7,614,893

6,966

82,599

+23,393

284






930

California

39,512,223

12,026

113,700

+87,443

276






6,917

Massachusetts

6,949,503

11,736

68,800

+29,734

216






1,441

Colorado

5,758,736

4,173

22,071

+8,795

111






568

Georgia

10,617,423

6,160

26,294

+13,730

201






1,530

Florida

21,477,737

11,111

102,067

+58,751

191






3.091

Illinois

12,671,821

10,357

53,581

+25,819

243






2,564

New Jersey

8,882,190

34,124

75,356

+39,754

846






1,465

Texas

28,995,881

6,110

63,751

+37,991

105






3,516

Oregon

4,217,737

899

17,434

+6,008

22






530

Pennsylvania

12,801,989

10,017

70,030

+36,575

136






2,887

Iowa

3,155,070

786

10,240

+4,891

14






697

Louisiana

4,648,794

12,496

58,498

+30,627

409






824

Maryland

6,045,680

3,125

25,610

+12,017

53






973

North Carolina

10,488,084

2,402

38,773

+19,828

24






2,064

District of Columbia

705,749

902

6,438

+3,627

21






N/A

Indiana

6,732,219

3,953

19,800

+9,970

116






1,118

Nebraska

1,934,408

321

5,379

+3,303

6






394

South Carolina

5,148,714

1,917

18,314

+14,525

40






882

Wisconsin

5,822,434

2,112

25,971

+1,591

56






1,075

Arizona

7,278,717

2,019

27,160

+13,288

52






1,116

Virginia

8,535,519

2,407

21,552

+10,943

52






1.283

Kentucky

4,467,673

831

15,572

+10,031

37






969

South Dakota

884,659

212

5,224

+2,007

2






245

Nevada

3,080,156

1,742

16,163

+7,013

46






527

Tennessee

6,833,174

3,321

41,391

+350

43






1,646

Minnesota

5,639,632

865

25,423

+7,766

24






698

New Hampshire

1,359,711

540

7,505

+2,767

7






265

Rhode Island

1,059,361

806

6,390

+3,555

17






192

New Mexico

2,096,829

495

15,632

+4,626

10






365

Ohio

11,689,100

3,739

41,871

+21,206

102






2,395

Connecticut

3,565,287

5,276

22,029

+10,129

165






757

Utah

3,205,958

1,428

28,043

+14,050

8






353

Hawaii

1,415,872

319

12,278

+5,278

3






542

Michigan

9,986,857

14,225

26,118

+8,739

540






1,869

Oklahoma

3,956,971

1,159

2,521

+887

42






809

Vermont

623,989

461

5,844

+2,143

20






87

Arkansas

3,017,825

743

10,370

+6,917

14






670

Delaware

973,764

593

6,467

+6,199

14






167

Kansas

2,913,314

743

10,370

+6,917

14






630

Mississippi

2,976,149

1,455

6,588

+3,270

35






910

Missouri

6,137,428

2,291

24,905

+12,520

24






1,477

North Dakota

762,062

186

6,207

+2,754

3






152

Wyoming

578,759

187

3,132

+1,492

0






128

Alabama

4,903,185

1,580

10,853

+5,863

43






1,268

Idaho

1,792,065

1,013

8,870

+4,588

10






235

West Virginia

1,787,147

282

7,686

+4,868

2






539

Maine

1,344,212

456

6,544

+2,897

10






312

Montana

1,068,778

265

6,177

+1,880

5






152

Alaska

731,545

171

6,040

+2,706

5






68

Total (4-05, 12p)


307,913

1,644,200


8,381






An online calculator is as here Meanwhile, although Covid-19 has hardly competed its run, yet for comparison with the flu we have the

We have the CDC morality rates for the flu per state for 2017-18 (13 states above 17 per 100,000 total population) and for Covid here (only 6 states above 17 per 100,000 people, as of April 16). And according to estimates, between 61,000 to 80,000 Americans died during the 2017-2018 season, the latter being the highest death toll in 40 years. During that 2017-2018 season, the percentage of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was at or above the epidemic threshold for 16 consecutive weeks. Nationally, mortality attributed to P&I exceeded 10.0% for four consecutive weeks, peaking at 10.8% during the week ending January 20, 2018, (https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/flu-season-2017-2018.htm) with older Americans dying at a rate of 169 Americans a day, or seven people per hour. (https://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-2018/older-flu-deaths-rising.html Yet which (besides the 1918 flu) were less deaths than the Asian flu of 1957–58 for which 116,000 American deaths are assigned (among about half of today's total US population). Also there was the Hong Kong flu of 1968–69 with its 100,000 American deaths.

It is estimated that about 80% of those infected with Covid-19 experience a mild case [WHO said the like] – about as serious as a regular cold – and recover without needing any special treatment. Meanwhile a study in Iceland reports that as of April 11, the country has “tested 10% of its population for coronavirus - a figure far higher than anywhere else in the world -” and that “Iceland's randomized tests revealed that between 0.3%-0.8% of Iceland's population is infected with the respiratory illness, that about 50% of those who test positive for the virus are asymptomatic [show no symptoms] when they are tested” (which is “a large percentage many experts studying the virus have suspected, but have had little firm data to corroborate”) and that since mid-March the frequency of the virus among Iceland's general population... – who do not have underlying health conditions or signs and symptoms of COVID-19 – has either stayed stable or been decreasing.

Another report is that those who are most vulnerable to death from Covid-19 are the aged with certain other heath conditions, thus 80 percent of US coronavirus deaths are people 65 and older. Then again, America murders over 2,000 of the most vulnerable souls a day (2017: https://www.guttmacher.org/fact-sheet/induced-abortion-united-states), while (for perspective) about 90 people die each day in the US from crashes, which are among the over 7,000 Americans who die every day in the US from a wide range of causes. (https://www.weisspaarz.com/leading-causes-death-by-state/)

• More on the 2019-2020 Flu season:

The overall cumulative hospitalization rate was 67.9 per 100,000 population, which is higher than all recent seasons at this time of year except for the 2017-18 season. Rates in children 0-4 years old and adults 18-49 years old are now the highest CDC has on record for these age groups, surpassing the rate reported during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Hospitalization rates for school-aged children are higher than any recent regular season but lower than rates during the pandemic.

Among 2,867 hospitalized adults with information on underlying medical conditions, 92.3% had at least one reported underlying medical condition, the most commonly reported were cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorder, obesity, and chronic lung disease. Among 472 hospitalized children with information on underlying medical conditions, 48.3% had at least one underlying medical condition; the most commonly reported was asthma. Among 477 hospitalized women of childbearing age (15-44 years) with information on pregnancy status, 27.5% were pregnant. (https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/index.htm#ILIActivityMap)(Retrieved 3-17-20)

• Outpatient Illness: ILINet. Visits to health care providers for influenza-like illness (ILI) decreased from 6.3% last week to 5.4% this week. All regions are above their baselines.

• Laboratory confirmed influenza-associated hospitalization rates for the U.S. population overall are higher than most recent seasons and rates for children 0-4 years and adults 18-49 years are the highest CDC has on record for these age groups, surpassing rates reported during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Hospitalization rates for school-aged children (5-17 years) are higher than any recent regular season but remain lower than rates experienced by this age group during the pandemic.

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/#S2

• Mortality surveillance: Based on National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) mortality surveillance data available on March 26, 2020, 8.2% of the deaths occurring during the week ending March 21, 2020 (week 12) were due to P&I. This percentage is above the epidemic threshold of 7.2% for week 12.

• 162 influenza-associated deaths in children have been reported so far this season. This number is higher than recorded at the same time in every season since reporting began in 2004-05, except for the 2009 pandemic.

Pediatric Deaths: 7 influenza-associated pediatric deaths occurring during the 2019-2020 season were reported this week. The total for the season is 162.. - https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/#S2 (Retrieved 4-06-20)

The highest rate of hospitalization is among adults aged ≥ 65, followed by children aged 0-4 years and adults aged 50-64 years.

Age Group

2019-2020 Season
Cumulative Rate per 100,000 Population

Overall

67.9

0-4 years

93.9

5-17 years

24.6

18-49 years

35.5

50-64 years

89.7

65+ years

178.8



And as concerns other causes of death.




Pneumonia and Influenza (P&I) Mortality Surveillance

Based on National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) mortality surveillance data available on April 16, 2020, 11.9% of the deaths occurring during the week ending April 11, 2020 (week 15) were due to P&I. This percentage is above the epidemic threshold of 7.0% for week 15.

Pneumonia and Influenza Mortality Surveillance from the National Center for Health Statistics Mortality Surveillance System

Information for selected week and previous two weeks, national summary, all ages

Week

Number of Influenza Deaths

Number of Pneumonia Deaths

Total Deaths

Percent Complete

Selected Week (week 15)

206

3,081

27,688

58.2%

Week 14

342

6,017

49,292

> 100%

Week 13

355

5,016

52,285

> 100%

Provisional Death Counts for Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19)

[Note] Coronavirus disease deaths are identified using the ICD–10 code U07.1. Deaths are coded to U07.1 when coronavirus disease 2019 or COVID-19 are reported as a cause that contributed to death on the death certificate. These can include laboratory confirmed cases, as well as cases without laboratory confirmation. If the certifier suspects COVID-19 or determines it was likely (e.g., the circumstances were compelling within a reasonable degree of certainty), they can report COVID-19 as “probable” or “presumed” on the death certificate (5, 6).

Pneumonia deaths are identified using underlying cause-of-death codes from the 10th Revision of ICD (ICD–10): J12–J18, excluding deaths that involve influenza (J09–J11). Influenza deaths are identified from the ICD–10 codes J09–J11, and include deaths with pneumonia or COVID-19 listed as a contributing cause of death.

Table 1. Deaths involving coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), pneumonia, and influenza reported to NCHS by week ending date, United States. Week ending 2/1/2020 to 4/11/2020.*

Data as of April 17, 2020

Week ending date in which the death occurred

COVID-19 Deaths (U07.1)1

Deaths from All Causes

Percent of Expected Deaths2

Pneumonia Deaths
(J12.0–J18.9)3

Deaths with Pneumonia and COVID-19
(J12.0–J18.9 and U07.1)3

Influenza Deaths
(J09–J11)4

Population5

Total Deaths

13,130

582,565

92

45,019

5,902

5,228

327,167,434

2/1/2020

0

56,589

95

3,639

0

454

327,167,434

2/8/2020

0

57,114

96

3,633

0

488

327,167,434

2/15/2020

0

56,143

95

3,638

0

499

327,167,434

2/22/2020

0

55,690

96

3,491

0

516

327,167,434

2/29/2020

5

55,036

96

3,516

3

586

327,167,434

3/7/2020

20

54,476

94

3,614

11

566

327,167,434

3/14/2020

44

52,704

92

3,586

22

558

327,167,434

3/21/2020

454

52,271

92

4,005

209

479

327,167,434

3/28/2020

2,339

53,687

96

5,185

1,090

368

327,167,434

4/4/2020

5,457

52,992

95

6,549

2,620

371

327,167,434

4/11/2020

4,811

35,863

65

4,163

1,947

343

327,167,434

NOTE: Number of deaths reported in this table are the total number of deaths received and coded as of the date of analysis and do not represent all deaths that occurred in that period.

*Data during this period are incomplete because of the lag in time between when the death occurred and when the death certificate is completed, submitted to NCHS and processed for reporting purposes. This delay can range from 1 week to 8 weeks or more, depending on the jurisdiction, age, and cause of death.

1Deaths with confirmed or presumed COVID-19, coded to ICD–10 code U07.1

2Percent of expected deaths is the number of deaths for all causes for this week in 2020 compared to the average number across the same week in 2017–2019. Previous analyses of 2015–2016 provisional data completeness have found that completeness is lower in the first few weeks following the date of death (8).

3Pneumonia death counts exclude pneumonia deaths involving influenza.

4Influenza death counts include deaths with pneumonia or COVID-19 also listed as a cause of death.

5Population is based on 2018 postcensal estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau (9)

Table 2. Deaths involving coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), pneumonia, and influenza reported to NCHS by age group, United States. Week ending 2/1/2020 to 4/11/2020.*

Data as of April 17, 2020

Age group

COVID-19 Deaths (U07.1)1

Deaths from All Causes

Pneumonia Deaths
(J12.0–J18.9)2

Deaths with Pneumonia and COVID-19
(J12.0–J18.9 and U07.1)2

Influenza Deaths
(J09–J11)3

Population4

All ages

13,130

582,565

45,019

5,902

5,228

327,167,434

Under 1 year

0

3,084

26

0

11

3,848,208

1–4 years

2

608

31

2

27

15,962,067

5–14 years

1

902

29

0

36

41,075,169

15–24 years

13

5,204

104

5

37

42,970,800

25–34 years

113

11,017

317

44

117

45,697,774

35–44 years

289

15,826

692

99

188

41,277,888

45–54 years

751

30,494

1,804

299

441

41,631,699

55–64 years

1,773

73,874

5,404

746

963

42,272,636

65–74 years

2,919

114,652

9,293

1,232

1,152

30,492,316

75–84 years

3,576

144,138

12,476

1,698

1,165

15,394,374

85 years and over

3,693

182,766

14,843

1,777

1,091

6,544,503

Table 3. Deaths involving coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), pneumonia, and influenza reported to NCHS by sex, United States. Week ending 2/1/2020 to 4/11/2020.*

Data as of April 17, 2020

Sex

COVID-19 Deaths (U07.1)1

Deaths from All Causes

Pneumonia Deaths
(J12.0–J18.9)2

Deaths with Pneumonia and COVID-19
(J12.0–J18.9 and U07.1)2

Influenza Deaths
(J09–J11)3

Total deaths

13,130

582,565

45,019

5,902

5,228

Male

7,823

300,021

23,876

3,469

2,659

Female

5,307

282,524

21,143

2,433

2,569

Unknown

0

20

0

0

0

NOTE: Number of deaths reported in this table are the total number of deaths received and coded as of the date of analysis and do not represent all deaths that occurred in that period.

*Data during this period are incomplete because of the lag in time between when the death occurred and when the death certificate is completed, submitted to NCHS and processed for reporting purposes. This delay can range from 1 week to 8 weeks or more, depending on the jurisdiction, age, and cause of death.

1Deaths with confirmed or presumed COVID-19, coded to ICD–10 code U07.1.

2Pneumonia death counts exclude pneumonia deaths involving influenza.

3Influenza death counts include deaths with pneumonia or COVID-19 also listed as a cause of death.



Table 4. Deaths involving coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), pneumonia, and influenza reported to NCHS by place of death, United States. Week ending 2/1/2020 to 4/11/2020.*

Data as of April 17, 2020

Place of death

COVID-19 Deaths (U07.1)1

Deaths from All Causes

Pneumonia Deaths
(J12.0–J18.9)2

Deaths with Pneumonia and COVID-19
(J12.0–J18.9 and U07.1)2

Influenza Deaths
(J09–J11)3

Total

13,130

582,565

45,019

5,902

5,228

Healthcare setting, inpatient

9,385

166,008

30,549

4,769

3,411

Healthcare setting, outpatient or emergency room

788

34,970

1,735

301

164

Healthcare setting, dead on arrival

19

1,552

38

7

10

Decedent's home

1,140

188,257

3,583

118

900

Hospice facility

140

43,445

2,549

78

269

Nursing home/long term care facility

1,550

111,415

5,800

595

407

Other

107

36,824

755

33

67

Place of death unknown

1

94

10

1

0

NOTE: Number of deaths reported in this table are the total number of deaths received and coded as of the date of analysis and do not represent all deaths that occurred in that period.

*Data during this period are incomplete because of the lag in time between when the death occurred and when the death certificate is completed, submitted to NCHS and processed for reporting purposes. This delay can range from 1 week to 8 weeks or more, depending on the jurisdiction, age, and cause of death.

1Deaths with confirmed or presumed COVID-19, coded to ICD–10 code U07.1.

2Pneumonia death counts exclude pneumonia deaths involving influenza.

3Influenza death counts include deaths with pneumonia or COVID-19 also listed as a cause of death.